So…what’s your point?

Think about the last presentation (or webinar) you attended; what was the presenter’s point? Designing a presentation around the most important point (a single message) greatly increases the chances that the audience will remember that message over time. Therefore, presentation design starts with crafting a clear concise message. One mistake presenters often make is to assume an audience can remember multiple “takeaways”. The old saying is true; if everything is important then nothing is important. I follow a message crafting method that I learned from Dcode Communications several years ago.  The method is based on the statement What I really want you to understand is _______ .  The you is… Read More

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A 3-step process to avoid a presentation rabbit hole

PowerPoint is not your friend! (not yet anyway) Here is a simple 3 step process to help you design an impactful presentation. It’s based on the fact that, early in the design process, PowerPoint is not your friend. It’s the proverbial rabbit hole. 1st – Craft your message The message is the thing you want your audience to remember for a long time.  It’s a single sentence that contains the words, you and/or your. It’s spoken by you very early in the presentation and it is the presentation’s destination.  You know you have a solid message when the word “how?” pops into your audience’s head after you say it. Write… Read More

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Send me your presentation

Send me your presentation If someone asks me to “send them my presentation” I must apologize for not videoing it. A presentation is a live event, like a play or concert. If I didn’t video record it, I can’t send it to you. The slides (the support visuals) are only a component of the presentation. A presentation is an interesting, focused, memorable experience you create for an audience. The slides (support visuals) are there for amplification, clarification and perhaps some decoration, but they are not the presentation. A presentation is much like a play. The scenery is not the play, the script is not the play, the actors (by themselves)… Read More

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