Be creative to find your pot of gold

I just wrapped up a Win Your Presentation workshop with a leading brand. The audience was a very dynamic group of business professionals. Like any workshop facilitator I handed out my evaluation form at the end of the session. But when you run under the flag of “Refuse to be Boring” you can’t let the last interaction with the audience be a boring form. So, I took a risk.   My form does have the typical workshop evaluation questions, but I “closed” with something a little creative. I asked the audience to answer the final question in crayon. I asked a group of corporate business professionals to colour the answer… Read More

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It’s a bit of an eye chart

I guess when we say, “It’s a bit of an eye chart” we believe that saying that somehow helps. We might as well say “I’ll do the next part of my presentation in Swahili because I know that no one in the audience speaks the language.” “Ni kidogo ya chati ya jicho.”   We know complex visuals are a challenge for our audience to understand. The other problem with complex visuals is they can also communicate an unintended message. Things like, this is too complicated to understand (zone out here). And you (or the topic) isn’t important enough for me to make much of an effort to clean this slide… Read More

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More than a hole

Legendary Harvard Business School marketing professor, Theodore Levitt, coined the phrase “People don’t want to buy a drill and a quarter-inch bit. They want a quarter-inch hole!” In his book, This is Marketing, Seth Godin takes the professor’s famous quote to the next level. They’re not buying drills or drill bits, they’re buying holes. Good sales and marketing people understand this. The drill and quarter inch bit isn’t the solution, the hole is. But this is only the first level of what some call “solution selling”.  In his book Seth Godin describes how there is much more to the “solution”. He uses an example of putting up a shelf, I’ll use… Read More

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